Harvard Style Referencing


Referencing is a standardised method of acknowledging sources of information and ideas that you have used in your report in a way that uniquely identifies their source. Direct quotations and figures, as well as ideas and theories, both from published and unpublished works must be referenced.

This appendix provides a brief guide to the Harvard Referencing style.

For Textbooks:

  • In the references and bibliography sections of the Project report, the referencing to material used from text should appear as follows:
The author, year of publication followed by the title of the textbook (in italics), publisher, location of the publisher.
e.g.
Saunders, M. et al (2003), Research Methods for Business Students (3rd edition), Pearson Education, Harlow.

 

·         In the text of the Project report the reference would appear as follows:

………………being identified by Saunders (2003) ……………………

 

 

·         If a direct quote is included in the text the page number where it can be found should also be included while referencing.

e.g.

“When drafting your literature review you therefore need to focus on your research question(s) and objectives.” (Saunders 2003, p47)

 

For journal articles:

 

  • In the references and bibliography sections of the Project report, the referencing to material used from journals should appear as follows:
The author’s name, followed by the title article, journal name in italics, volume number.
e.g.
Storey, J, Cressy, P, Morris, T and Wilkinson, A (1997) ‘ Changing employment practices in UK banking; case studies’, Personnel Review, 26:1, pp24-42.

 

·         In the text of the project report the same reference would appear as follows:

 ………………being identified by Storey et al (1997) and ………….

For websites:

  • In the references and bibliography sections of the Project report, the referencing to material used from websites should appear as follows:
If you are referring to a specific article, it should be detailed as for journal articles as mentioned above, but with the additional information as to where it is available on the Internet.
e.g.
Jones A and Smith A (eds) 2001 ‘What exactly is the Labour Force Survey?’ (online) (cited 20 December 2001).   Available from URL: http//www.statistics.gov.uk/nbase/downloads.theme_labour/what_exactly_isLFS1.pdf

Please note that all sources referenced in the main text should also be fully detailed in the reference and bibliography section.

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